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Preparing for a Fashion Career

 

Photographic fashion modeling is a fascinating and creative career that can be very financially  rewarding. Many people believe they don't have the necessary good looks or the talent to break into this glamorous profession. Most don't realize that the most important and valuable skill they need is one that can be learned. Even though you may consider yourself an average looking person, you can become a successful model, if you know the skill of photo posing.

 

 The biggest problem with beginners to the fashion business is not knowing the basic photo posing techniques. You have to possess enough of a sense of your physical self to project that aura of confidence needed for fashion photography. If you need to be coached on every facial and bodily expression, all liveliness and spontaneity will be drained from the resulting photographs.

 

There are four areas of fashion modeling they are;

1)           Editorial Fashion   This kind of photography is shown on the editorial as opposed to the advertising pages of a fashion magazine. The photographer is responsible to the magazine not to the manufacturer of the product. The photographer largely determines the concept to be followed, the models and locations, and the mood of the entire shoot.

2)          Advertising Fashion  The photographs are produced for a manufacturing or a advertising agency, and the product takes precedence overall other concerns. In this type of job the objective is to present a product in a way that will best promote it.

3)          Catalog Modeling  The purpose is to present clothing or other merchandise in a very straight forward and highly detailed way The objective is to clearly show each feature of the garment or product.

4)          Illustrative Modeling  This is a variety of ad photography that is set in a real life environment where two or more models are posing and reacting to each other in a setting and manner that is natural to the product.

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Over the years, new comers to the fashion business have asked many questions about the model's portfolio. The two asked most are, what kinds of shots should I have in my portfolio and how often will I need new pictures.

 

A complete portfolio should have 20 to 24 shots but in the beginning strive for these that I've listed and let the rest evolve naturally.

 

1)       A head shot showing casual, natural looking hair, waist length

2)      Formal attire shown in an editorial type setting, full length.

3)      A sporty, casual shot  in a suit or pants, shot out -of-doors full length

4)      A swimsuit shot or T-shirt and shorts, full length

5)      Two models in formal evening or sports attire editorial style

6)      Head shot with a hat, showing your complete profile.

7)      A fur coat shot three-quarter view, advertising style

8)      Two models catalog style with model of same sex.

9)      Three-quarter shot demonstrating a product.

10)    A well styled head shot with accessories and perfectly groomed make-up and hair

11)   An authentic sports clothes action shot full length

12)   A dress shot advertising style, full length

 

 

Most models, unless they have had an unusual break take about a year to learn photo posing an to present an experienced looking portfolio. After that every couple of months you should have some new pictures or tearsheets.

 

Your Portfolio

 

 Your portfolio should be creative with clothes, getting different looks, expressions, and angles of your face and body in various moods. The makeup and hair style should be in a rather classic manner so the photgraphs will stay current looking for a long time. Once you discover your best look keep that hair and makeup style for at least a year so that you look the same in your portfolio as you do in person. The wardrobe should consist of hats, scarves, and jackets so you may quickly change a look. Your posing style should be classic and graphic and your expressions should be varied:bright-eyed, elegant and happy.For the pose place your feet in the third ballet position, push your hip out to the side, use your arms to make interesting shapes, flirt with your shoulders, and project your feeling.

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